Acquiring a fully automatic weapon?

Discussion in 'Machine Guns' started by Philosophydaddy, May 13, 2014.

  1. Philosophydaddy

    Philosophydaddy Beginner Shooter

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    I know that people in the states can acquire machine guns on consignment but what does that mean? I'm fairly sure it is not legal to simply possess a machine gun or similar full auto weapon. Am I right? What are requirements to own such a weapon? I am quite curious about it :p.
  2. GearZ

    GearZ Decent Shooter

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    In most states, you can own a fully-automatic weapons. Now for the "buts". You knew those were coming, right? ;)

    • Your state must allow for their ownership.
    • Some states that do allow them have their own requirements to be met. Some of them are a bit Byzantine.
    • If you meet the first two, you can buy a full-auto weapon by handling the Form 4 for the transfer (in duplicate), get the Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO) of your location to sign off on it, pay a $200 tax to the Feds, get fingerprinted (again, in duplicate), submit all those materials to the ATF and wait an average of 8-10 months for approval. When approved, you can pickup your machine-gun and rock and roll.
    That's all well and good, but the real pain in the butt is the cost of a machine-gun. There was a law passed in 1986 that ended new registrations of machine-guns. As such there is a fixed supply and lots of demand for pre-86 guns, prices have spiraled to insane levels. A beater Mac-10, for example, can go for $4,000+. A nice AC-556 (full-auto Mini-14) can go for $7,500-8,000. Want a vintage Tommy gun? You'll need $17,000+. Anyway, you get the idea. The market is being artificially overpriced by the aforementioned legislation and nothing else.

    Any machine gun made post-May 86 is verboten for us serfs to own. So if you want a newer design, one is out of luck.

    Hope that helps.
  3. Thomas

    Thomas Decent Shooter

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    I would also like to add to GearZ fine post, why would you want one? They are ridiculously expensive, and blow through ammo like crazy. Not to mention, it automatically places you on a registry. I wouldn't doubt that our government already has an illegal gun registry, but owning a machine gun assures this is the case.
  4. GearZ

    GearZ Decent Shooter

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    That is a good point. Back in the day, ammo prices weren't all that bad, so running a buzz gun could be a fun and only somewhat expensive hobby. For cartridges are going these days, you could burn through C-notes in a matter of minutes. Even the pistol caliber subguns would be pricey. Those running 5.56/.223 or 7.62/.308? Ouch!

    There are some .22LR rattleguns on the registry, but they are not as common, and therefore command a premium. The American 180, for example, is a hoot to shoot and is one of the few you could do semi-cheaply. The Norrell trigger pack (registered trigger group that fits a regular 10/22) is another one. Neither options have an inexpensive price of admission.
  5. MichaelAnders

    MichaelAnders Rookie Shooter

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    It is legal to own fully automatic weapons in the United States and so are grenades and suppressors as-well. You need to contact your local ATF before you try to buy these things to find out what paper work and what tax stamps and what licenses you need and how much these cost first. , some people might be a bit reluctant to call the ATF asking questions about what is legal or what you need to do to get them but it is perfectly fine really. If they ask you some crazy questions like why do you want to know ? or what are you planning on doing with them just simply say that you are interested in knowing the lawful way to get them and want information to know whats legal and whats not and how to get it. Ask what paper work do you need , ask about anything because laws change from time to time and you want to keep up on the latest changes so that you don't think oh I can't do this when in reality you really can, the wise thing is to ask. Ask what states the weapon or the grenade or the suppressor is legal in. You can also go on the ATF website, you must have a tax stamp and the paper work. you can even own a rocket launcher however it is expensive but if you really like guns money should not be a big deal.
  6. Profit5500

    Profit5500 Decent Shooter

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    I already knew that was going to be a issue. I mean trying to buy a machine gun is a pretty expensive task.
  7. Toasty95

    Toasty95 Rookie Shooter

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    If I had the money to blow, first thing I'd do is move to the south, then buy me a fully-auto boomstick.
  8. Profit5500

    Profit5500 Decent Shooter

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    I would like to go to Nevada and try out a fully auto AK47 with a 70 round drumbell. Nevada is one of the places where you can get your hands on fully auto weapons I just can't stand being in California.

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